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The Importance of Establishing a Puppy Routine

The Importance of Establishing a Puppy Routine

It’s been a little over a month I began my adventure with Elliot. I’ve had a lot of fun, and I’ve learned a lot. I like to think that he has too. As the weeks go by, I feel our bond growing, and I remember that getting a puppy is about building a relationship as you would with any human being except that it requires more attention and more listening. Elliot’s life revolves around his interaction with me, which means that I am responsible for the quality of his life. Thus, how I respond to both his triumphs and accidents is of no small consequence. Establishing a puppy routine is essential for both our sanity and our bond.

Elliot sitting in a box looked proud.

Very proud of himself.

What exactly have I learned from this approach?

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Easter Bunnies: What to Know Before You Buy

Easter Bunnies: What to Know Before You Buy

With Easter coming around, many parents are preparing to surprise and delight their children with colorful baskets filled with even more colorful Easter eggs, which are filled with the much longed-for candy. Some parents, are also buying Easter-themed pets for their children. While such impulse buys, seem fun, even exhilarating (who doesn’t love a new pet), such consumer habits have led to many homeless rabbits after the holiday ends. Rabbits are either left in shelters or abandoned in the streets or parks.

Moreover, people who buy rabbits at Easter are usually first-time rabbit owners, or even first-time pet owners. Research is often neglected into exactly what it takes to take care of a rabbit (much more than a cat) and what type of commitment owning a rabbit requires (a lot!). First of all, it is important to know that much like a dog or a cat, rabbits, or bunnies, require at least a 10-year commitment. Rabbits are sensitive, shy, and literally delicate—their backs break easily and if taken off their strict diets they die easily. Rabbits are much more suitable for the adult, or responsible teenage, owner.

Rabbits are not the only animal to avoid at Easter—thousands of “Easter” themed animals are bought and then abandoned. Unless you are willing to make the commitment, both in terms of care and long-term ownership, don’t adopt (and definitely don’t buy).

If you have read this and still want to get your Rabbit, here are some things to consider:

  1. Do NOT buy. With so many rabbits in shelters, please adopt.
  2. Your furry friend will need a large cage, with a litter box, toys, a water bottle, and of course bedding.
  3. Note on the litter box: they will need to be trained to use it, much like a kitten. There will be accidents.
  4. You will need to spay or neuter your rabbit. If you do not spay your female rabbit she will develop cancer, if you do not neuter your male rabbit he will spray.
  5. They will need a lot of supervision. They should not be left alone outside. They scare very easily, which can literally result in being frightened to death.
  6. Their diet is super specific and cannot be altered without serious consequences.
  7. You cannot keep them caged all the time. They are not goldfish and they need ample free time outside their cage.
  8. There are very few veterinaries that work on rabbits. We don’t even do it at Campus Commons Pet Hospital. You should take care to find out that does before you buy to ensure you can give your new pet proper care.
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Pet obesity — how can we prevent and reverse it?

Pet obesity — how can we prevent and reverse it?

Food, glorious food! It’s that time of year again, where the treats seem never-ending and relaxing inside by the fire is much more appealing than going outside for a stroll. As humans, we know that we have to keep ourselves in check and maintain a healthy weight, but our pets aren’t wired that way, so we have to take care of that for them. Pet obesity is a growing epidemic that is totally preventable and reversible.

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